Vol. 5 November 2007
Velocity's Quarterly Whenever-We-Get-Around-To-It Newsletter
   
 
This is a ListBox

Velocity University
Scott Baker

Velocity University
Duane Swing

Another Interesting Comparison
Duane Swing & Ken Baker

Twin Dreams
Duane Swing

Flight Training
John Abraham

Are You Clear on the 51% Rule?
Duane Swing

Service Center Updates
Duane Swing

 

 

 

Service Center Updates
Duane Swing

We have been lucky in securing the services of Mike Snyder to do your Conditional Inspections and other aircraft repair work. As most of you know, Mike is a former employee of Velocity and now works as a consultant and private contractor for us. He is a Velocity pilot and an IA with lots of experience. Call for an appointment if you would like to schedule work on your Velocity.

The Service Center has seen a lot of work lately on previously owned airplanes with the new owners wanting Conditional Inspections, repair work and problem solving advice. In one case, the new owner was told the airplane had a 200 horsepower Lycoming IO360 engine. Once the cowling was removed it became apparent that the engine was actually a 0360, 180 horsepower with the fuel injection added later. This combination does not make a 200 horse engine. The new buyer flies out of an airport that is over 6000 feet in elevation. On a hot summer day the density altitude is over 10,000 feet and he is flying with a fixed pitched propeller that will only turn 2250 RPM static. We feel his only option is first a constant pitch propeller and then a turbo. May the buyer beware.

Occasionally we actually get a “thank you” from a satisfied customer. This e-mail comes from Tom who had purchased a flying Velocity with the old up-draft cooling system and brought it to us with a cylinder temperature issue. He was actually showing 500+ degrees on #4 cylinder in cruise and ask if we could do anything to help. We went to work first on the exhaust to isolate the heat radiation from the up-draft system and then on the lower under-wing air scoops to re-direct the incoming air. Testing went in stages after each modification until we were satisfied. Tom writes: “Just wanted to thank you, picked it up today and it ran great. Highest temp was 404 on cyl #4 @ 25 squared, 398 on cyl 3 and 370/380 on 1 & 2. (This was mid day in heat and bumps flying back low). Could tell by the engine monitor download all the tweaking you had to do. Professional looking job at a very reasonable cost..Thanks very much.”

Something to Check:

We just had a main gear retraction on a landing incident in a customer’s aircraft and it is important that we all learn from the cause of this failure. We try to make it very clear in the instructions that when the gear is in the down and locked position, the cables attached to the upper end of the gear, down to the pulley assembly, not be overly tight. If it is, then any side loading on the gear legs could cause the over center safety arm to become disengaged due to the additional pull on the cable that is already too tight. I just inspected a Velocity XL and during the gear down test, the owner/builder had to kick the tire to get the over center arm to lock into the groove. Upon inspection I found the cables to be drum tight. This was an accident just waiting to happen. When ask why they were so tight, the builder said he had to tighten them to get the wheels to retract fully into the wells. FRIENDS, this is NOT how we get the wheels to fit tighter into the wells. The procedure is to shorten the aluminum tube spacer that is on the main hydraulic cylinder. This is what will allow the gear to retract further into the wells. DO NOT DO IT BY TIGHTENING THE CABLES.